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to justify. you know how the sunlight foundation added up political spending in this past election to see who got the most bang for their buck in their political spending? it was really bad on the right. the republican party's house campaign committee spent almost $65 million, but only 32% of what they spent went to campaigns in which their candidate was successful. so two-to-one, their money was spent on losing. it was worse for the republican party's senate campaign. for their investment of $32 million, only 24% paid off in terms of races that went the way they wanted to. three to one, their money was spent losing. freedomworks was about the same. and the chamber of commerce, which is supposed to be such an impressible and unassailable campaign juggernaut, the chamber of commerce spent $32 million, but less than 7% of what they spent went to winning candidates they wanted to win, or against losing candidates that they wanted to lose. less than 7%. they were 93% ineffective in what they spent. even worse than that was karl rove's american crossroads, which was like the conservative politics
is stephanie schriock. she is the president of emily's list. guest: this election was a mandate for women's leadership across the country. an historic number of women were sworn in it to congress last week. this election was also about women voters and women's issues, some of which i would prefer not having a debate about. we will see more and more women stepping up to run. host: 20 senators, 81 representatives in 2013. what issues to the brink when it comes to women's issues? guest: we have never had 20 women in the u.s. senate. it is a great benchmark to hit. i would like to see it at 50. we're adding diversity to the debate. we will end up with policies that are best for our committees. these women are bringing different perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of
. >> and it is legacy material. he won re-election on -- one of only eight presidents to win two terms by 51% of the popular vote. what does he use that mandate for? also -- >> that's your question. when are you going to do what you got there to do? stop worrying about getting there again. >> the presidents don't always just follow public opinion, they have to shape public opinion. >> can i ask you -- okay. i'm a suburbanite city mouse. i generally have lived in suburban areas, but i don't know why you need a gun show. i mean, if you want to buy a gun, you go to a dealer. why do you have to have a show? why does it have to be a big hotel opens its doors to a bunch of gun salesmen and people -- >> well -- >> why do you have to have a gun show? >> far be it from me to comment in depth on gun culture, but i do think it's fun. gun shows are fun. it's like auto shows. >> you walk out with -- >> if you have the universal background check that the governor is talking about, then fine. the problem with gun shows is they're used as a huge loophole to sell a lot of unregulated guns. that's the problem
, involving people who are local democratic elected officials, union lerdz, local party officials, and grassroots activists beloved in the communities, and we would e-mail districts of those who support benefit cuts, and say, hey, who wants to run for congress? >> host: have you launched that warning to some members of congress? >> we have. we have launched it publicly, and we have a more generic sense saying it's a warning. we want to be transparent, and, honestly, we don't yearn for the war on the left. it's ironic for us, me, woke up in 2008 and thought what can i do today to get barack obama elected president. having fight a democratic president on social security and just to be clear, he put -- he publicly admitted he put social security benefit cuts on the table. that is not a position i want to be in. that's not what i worked for in 2008, and what some of the other people worked for >> host: worked for it in 2012? regretting working for the president? >> our organization prioritized congress in 2012. the number one candidate was elizabeth warren calling out the ig and big w
and have a good day. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> a record number of women were elected to the u.s. u.s. house and senate in november. there are now more women in the u.s. u.s. senate. conversation women candidates who ran for office in 2012. this 35 minute event is hosted by emily's list which is a political action committee that supports pro-choice women candidates running for congress and governor. >> the national press club here and we are privileged to have stephanie schriock, the president of emily's list to be here today. as they well should after their spectacular when in the last presidential election. stephanie has been very active in democratic circles. she was national finance director for howard dean's 2004 election. she then helped the united states senator john -- unseat an 18-year-old incumbent in the state of montana. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator franken in minnesota and she defeated norm colman. correct? she is a graduate of man caught a state university in minnesota and she grew up in montana. here is stephanie, the president of emily's list w
practices at the time until late into the 20th century, and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, that proceeded independence. they falsified even the senseless. now, this was in custody, if you check the notes of the so-called home office which is where the colonies of the british are administered, they look for the book of harold smith, a civil servant in nigeria at the time. he got into trouble because he did not want to carry out orders. he was ordered to participate in the falsification of sensors, but falsification of the first elections. in short, the bar was handed over to what they considered the backward north, the feudal north. very suspect because they were radicalized by western ideas, british uncomfortable with that so they left power in the hands of the north. that political dishonesty led to a long story, cutting it short, but led eventually to the very first military cue in nigeria which was staged by -- led by certain southerners from the eastern part. there was a reprisal, and then a series of massacres, civilian massacres which led eventually to
round of elections? solvation does not lie with shutting down the federal government. it has been demonstrated time and time again in a well, the president did win in my district. think what the american public voted for was a stalemate. because they wanted to have some accountability and traparency. >> i agree with that. i'm talking about the power of the house of representatives himself. >> i think that's why we lost this last one. we were progressive. we weren't in front of the issues and we didn't have a discussion with the american peop. i think we do our best work to open that up to all the great ideas on the floor in regular order and put it out there to the american people. 71% of the american people and spending cuts. lou: your leadership chose to go one-on-one with the president. and speaker boehner says he's not going to do that again. he has moved to regular order. you're on the right in the house of representatives, republicans were insisting upon that all along. he has changed his position and the american people have to be slightly perplexed that now the only way to
community in terms of what he represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for grante
and get a head start in to a year full of budget fights. >> right. especially an election and very critical of the other side's lack of diversity. valerie jarrett's leg was in night's photo. >> that's important. >> are we going to hear pushback on this nomination at all from the left? lew has less wall street -- fewer wall street ties than geithner an he was a coo at citigroup. he said during the 2010 crisis he didn't believe financial deregulation was a proximate cause of the crisis. will we see pushback from the left on this confirmation? >> we saw barney sanders of vermont say he's against the nomination but there's another problem, too. house republicans who are the only republicans in control in town really almost despise jack lew, do not see him as an honest broker and someone to work with and a story on politico tomorrow i'm working on puts a nail in the coffin on tax reform and republicans trying to jump start for a long time and problems practically with house republicans and negotiating budget deals, with jack lew. i mean, john boehner doesn't want him in the room negotia
to get his picks into his cabinet. and coming after losing the presidential election, losing seats in the house and senate, to democrats, the republicans have been looking for a way to ding the president. they were able to ding him by denying him the choice of susan rice, the u.n. ambassador to be the president's next secretary of state. they view going after chuck hagel as being one more notch in this crazy war against the president when a lot of people in the country want congress to focus not so much on chuck hagel as they want them to focus on what's happening with sequester and the budget and debt ceiling and other things that have direct impacts on people's lives. from a policy standpoint, does this come down to bush era neocon, that reminds them that he opposed the war. >> he did oppose the surge. for republicans this is about somebody whom they disagree with on policy and never liked that much in the senate because he wasn't the kind of senator that had a lot of friends, that played the relationship game at a high level. and so it's not like he has solid friendships that ca
election. but most of them, honestly, were from the republican primaries. come on. very few of the laugh out loud moments from the last election involved president obama himself telling a laugh out loud deadpan joke. but it did happen once. >> i think governor romney maybe hasn't spent enough time looking at how our military works. you mentioned the navy, for example, and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well, governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets because the nature of our military's changed. we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. we have ships that go underwater. nuclear submarines. >> ships that go underwater. after that moment in the third presidential debate last year there was a brief but fascinating flurry of really earnest fact checking about the question of whether or not there really are fewer bayonets in the u.s. military right now. remember? tmz had an exclusive inside scoop on outrage from the bayonet community. "we are not obsolete." in fact, the last famous bayonet charge in american history was in 1951 during the ko
? and are you completely committed to stepping down as president of the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered. by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization. to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then-host government, we achieved our central goal. which is or have come very close to achieving our central goal, which is to decompass tate al qaeda. to dismantle them. to make sure that they can't attack us again. and everything that we've done over the last ten years, from the prospective of the u.s. national security interests, have been focused on that aim. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be
their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would be bereft of any protection. >> what kind of country are we going to find? >> a deeply divided country. it is divided, as you saw, from those that don't like him and those that adore him. that is not a social divide. in which the middle class doesn't like him and the poor does. 45% voted against him. the country doesn't have a middle class. in order to get 45% of the vote, that means the millions of poor people voted against him, but people also voted for him. they have a very strong an almost spiritual connection with
davis ever when an actual election? >> he was a senator. wesson elections were -- and he was nominated in a constitutional convention as a moderate in montgomery alabama in february of 1861. i don't think he ever did stand for election. one of the things americans think, one of the things they're told, the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution, but it was not. a number of crucial changes, and one of them was they had a one-term executive, and i believe it was 5-year executive term. he avoided reelection. >> professor mccurry, did -- was there a lot of political infighting during the war? >> yes. there was. and there were no for more -- for all political parties. one of the things that is interesting is that it so quickly became on the ropes that a lot of things that were planned never really materialized. and there was political opposition, but it was theoretically everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican party ticket offered in the south. you could not vote for lincoln. but there were all lined with the southern wing of the democ
was indistinct, and even as late as the election of 1860, although lincoln, i think, very powerfulfully and the republican party tried to make a case for -- i think it's more of a political construction and a reflection of the reality. >> host: we talk a lot today about red states and blue states. but there are a lot of conservatives in california and a lot of liberals in texas. >> guest: absolutely. >> host: was it the same with slavery? was there a lot of sympathy towards the institution of slavery? >> guest: more to the point, the democratic party was probably -- up to the election of 1860, during the period of popular elections for national office -- was the majority party in the united states. and it washat was devoted to what we might call state rights, and local control. and they put together a coalition that included slaveholders in the south and a hole variety of people in the north, including urban laborers who were pushing back against the centralization of power. think what is true is state right sentiment was widespread. some sympathy for secessionism was sufficiently wides
. >> yeah. so, look, all in all, how is 2013 going to be compared to 2012? we have u.s. elections, i.t. companies, business from the u.s. there's a lot of uncertainty over the fiscal cliff. has there been a withdraw of investment but maybe it will bounce back? albeit, you've still got to get through debt ceiling and other negotiations. >> i think 2013 compared to 2012 and 2013, 2013 will be more positive. for the election year in europe and considering most of the companies infrastructure is more than 50% of the exposure to the u.s. market. most companies who have their renewal budgets, they tried to push it to the next year, the election budgets. so most companies do have good exposure to the u.s. i think 2013 is still better than 2013 compared to 2012. >> there's a lot of talk about on-shoring of business by the u.s. certainly with regard to manufacturing, you've got the natural gas boom in the u.s. which is making it much more attractive for the u.s. to manufacture stuff on-shore as well as 3g, 2g manufacturing. are there any factors on the software side that can have an impact on
if that blows some fuses in germany. >> 2013 is a so-called super election-year in austria, meaning that voters will go to the polls several times. regional parliaments are due to be elected in four of the country's states ts sprg, followed by the national election of the federal parliament this autumn. it will not be an easy campaign for the traditional parties. they face competition from a political newcomer. some austrian politicians are reminded of a time in the early 1990's when a man came from the far right and meddled with the traditional austrian political landscape. he died four years ago, and his party has since lost some of its significance, but some former supporters have now found a new political home with a new party. >> he who has the gold makes the rules -- that was the model used when introducing the party in the timber. he was born into a poor family in austria but went to canada to make his millions. now he has returned to make a dramatic entrance on the political scene. >> i am certain that this is a very important day that will go down iaustan history. i also think it will
a new election. >> what is the situation right now with the cease-fire? >> there is no cease-fire right now, the whole point of the talks here is to sign a deal to get a cease-fire going. what we are waiting for right now is president bozize to arrive. we understand from our sources he will leave probably very soon to get here. then there will be a head of state summit meeting with various presidents in the region, including the president of gabon. they will want to get a deal as quickly as possible because the situation is deeply worrying. the united nations, and also the european union. because the rebels are 160 kilometers from the capitol and the threatening to take it if they did not come to some sort of an agreement. >> reporting from gabon, thank you very much. >> much more ahead. u.s. president barack obama looking at bypassing congress to enforce tighter gun laws. a makeover for the board game monopoly. you decide which changes get to pass go. >> unsettled picture across europe. particularly this weather system pulling cold air in behind it. we are likely to see snow developing
of you have deprived us from speaking the truth. whoever is elected the president, our hope is that you will represent - i hope is that you will be a leader, a good definition of a good leader is a leader who knows the way, shows the way and goes the way. thank you very much. >> president: thank you very much. next speaker. >> good afternoon my name is tina [indiscernible] and having spent 16 years in women education i applaud women going forward. i don't look like a person of color but if you look at my freckles i consider myself a person of color too. i have worked in district 3, closely with many supervisors. welcome to supervisor yee and breed, welcome aboard. this is a great group. in this me very proud to be a san franciscan, and to call him my supervisor. thank you very much. >> president: next speaker. >> good afternoon and happy new year to you all. it is a pleasure to be here. my name is mattie scott, the founder of healing for our families and our nation, working hard in san francisco over the last 16 years to stop senseless violence. i lost my youngest son to gun viol
decision in the wake of president obama's re-election. the republican party is divided. that's being isolated and ignored by the right wingers. that's a problem for the gop. that southern dominance may sentence the entire party to irrelevance. >>> conservative ideologues are itching for another fight with president obama, this time saying they may shut down the government altogether or risk a credit catastrophe. could somebody remind these guys who won the election, again. >>> plus, the nra has made its position clear. the answer to gun violence, more guns. we have evidence that posting armed guards everywhere has the exact opposite effect. the latest battle lines as the obama administration moves to curb the availability of assault weapons. >>> let me finish with why this nomination of chuck hagel should be given a solid, solid chance, and this is "hardball," the place for politics, >>> hillary clinton is back at work at the state department. this morning she chaired the weekly meeting of the department's leadership team, and one thing on the agenda will be testifying on capitol hil
, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think unfortunately the situation in iraq was deteriorated politically over the last year and also iraq has been less aligned with american interests in that more aligned with the irony interest in so far as the search conflict is concerned. >> host: we are taking your calls and questions in this segment, so feel free. the phone lines are open now. republicans, 202-737-0002, democrats, 585-8882. if you served in iraq we want to have your thoughts on what's happening now. phone lines are open. we want to go back to the polit
of the agenda. it's an obligationed based on the nature of the electorate that re-elected barack obama. i think that's job one. >> john: well, latino voters put this president in office twice and he promised repeatedly that it would be top of his agenda. do you think he'll follow through with his promise and push through legislation this month and what kind of reform he'll consider since he has made the dream act law already. >> i think he'll formalize that and put in place the mechanism by which the dream act is a stepping stone to comprehensive reform. pardon me. >> john: go ahead, please. >> whether or not he has time much more than that, i don't know. but once he gets a system in place, and it's operating and you know, thousands and thousands of people come out of the shadows, it will be very hard caring what happened last fall to roll anything back. >> john: let me ask you about his nominees. they'll throw as much mud at chuck hagel for the unspeakable crime of being of the about the iraq war, do you think they'll slow down the process trying to bog it down or will they see john kerry sail
. ♪ >>> energized by his re-election and that fiscal cliff deal, president obama is now taking ogg on two of washington's most powerful special interest groups. pro-gun and pro-israel lobbies. dominating chuck hagel point to a president unafraid of going head to head with two powerful lobbying groups that have long wheeleded strong influence in washington. i'm joined by national journal political correspondent beth rinehart who writes about the president's busting second term. >> thanks for having me. >> the president is relishing his approval numbers and the fact that he didn't have to run again. he actually talked about the second term on "meet the press." i want to play that. >> one of the nice things about never having another election again. i will never campaign again. is you know, i think you can rest assured that all i care about is making sure i leave behind an america that is stronger, more prosperous, more stable and secure than when i first came into office. >> the first thing, rahm emanuel when chief of staff, had this policy, you don't take on a fight that you don't have a r
baseball writers. >> this is one whait means to be elected from the hall of fame. so consider irony when baseball traditionally honors its best, this time, reopened an old wound exposing the worst. >> i think baseball never figured out how to process steroid era. it's awkward for the game and fans. this is more awkwardness. >> lance will gyms not a baseball writer but on a day they elect nod one its safe so-to-say they influence them, writers like mark purdy when abstained. >> i did not vote for ware barry bonds, roger clemens, sammy sosa, mike piazza. >> all are great player who's otherwise have been shoo ins without steroid autos people asked them to vote in this election. one of the guidelines is supposed to consider sportsman ship. all right? to me, if you cheated that is addressing those issues. i still don't have information about what the whole landscape looked like. to some, the hall of fame is about performance, art did vote for bonds. >> barry bonds deserves to be in the hall of fame. a man who wins seven cy yungz deserves to be now.. >> so many great names, so many questions s
he won the election, wendell willkie, fuji beach, was in the office and they remained friends. he said to the president why do you keep that man so close to you, that man being hopkins. wilkie didn't like hopkins and roosevelt said you know, you may be in this office some day and you'll understand. but he asks for nothing except to serve me. >>> now to the university of alabama law school in tuscaloosa for a discussion of labor and employment law. civil rights leaders and retired federal judge u.w. clemon spoke to students about the history of title seven of the civil rights act. this is about an hour. >> on behalf of the society and the american constitutional society, we'd like to welcome you all today to a remarkable speaker, the honorable u.w. clemon. the former chief judge of the united states district court for the northern district of alabama. long before his notable career on the federal bench, justice u.w. clemon distinguished himself as a civil rights activist, lawyer and alabama state senator. as a student educated in the segregated public schools of jefferson county, h
a senator. said he would only serve two terms. only served two terms. and when he was elected the second time, he was elected with 83% of the vote. this is a guy respected by his fellow citizens of nebraska. served here for a total of 12 years. and what did he do when he left the senate? he came became an ac testimony knick georgetown, school of foreign service, teaching the new leaders. he also has been co-chairman of the president's intelligence advisory board. he is alsos on the defense policy board. this is a gentleman who knows all of these issues in depth. he is a fellow who speaks his mind. he sometimes gets in trouble with those who think he should not speak his mind but he says what he believes and he sticks with t so the issues that are being raised now are important issues and that's why we have a confirmation hearing and i'm sure that chuck will be able to deal with those issues at the hearing. >> let's go through a few of them. >> all right. >> he failed to label iran's revolutionary guard a terror organization, advocated direct talks with iran which have not borne fruit and
. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fighting and those sorts of things. it's dangerous ground for any politician because of that. >> we are seeing
of the seven u.s. presidents re-elected since world war ii have been less popular in the second terms. so can the president use early momentum to push the policy agenda? let's spin. guys, i have been saying for a while now i think that his second term he's going the see a lot more pushback from the friends on the left than his foes on the right. for one, he's been re-elected. i think the gop has generally resigned themselves to the fact that they're going to be four more years to obama and they have a little less incentive to hang him for every misstep he has but democrats are incentives to watch him more carefully. one, payment, you know, a number of groups, unions for one, invested heavily in barack obama's re-election and i'm sure they want some roi now. two, accountability on the promises the president made in the first term, promises on gay marriage, promises on immigration, maybe promises on guns now. and third, this idea of a liberal legacy. think i that a number of folks on the left were willing to forego or ignore some of the issues in his first term that now they're looking at. the
know, you get elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure, and they respond to incentives, and unless -- we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany, or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. so we have to get much more active if we're going to have a society that is going to respond to this enduring problem. the rate of child poverty in the united states of america, we should be ashamed a nation this strong has child poverty, and the kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to the flag, the phrase, accomplish justice for all,shoo be a demand, compelling as separation, and should be a conscious conviction to mak
, who was courting gun owners in his very pro-second amendment state of nevada, in a tough battle for re-election. >> i also want to thank you, senator, for your support every day at the federal level for the second amendment, and for the rights of american gun owners. >> both reid and the nra declined to talk to cnn on camera, but democratic sources on capitol hill say the nra was not the only threat to the president's health care bill. lawmakers were also worried about conspiracy theories, circulating among gun enthusiasts that falsely accused the obama administration of plotting to use the health care law to go after gun owners. one group, gun owners of america, insists it could still happen. >> it says that all of our medical records are available to be pawed through by bureaucrats somewhere in washington, looking for a reason to disenfranchise gun owners. >> the senate majority leader's views on gun control are changing. he's in a different place than he was in 2010, says an adviser. consider how reid answered the question after the july movie theater massacre in colorado. >> with the schedu
's called americans for responsible solutions. they say their goal is to, quote, encourage elected officials to stand up for solutions that will prevent gun violence. it's a new political pressure group, in other words. congresswoman gabby giffords and her husband launched this today in a high profile, well done media blitz. they sat through a moving interview with diane sawyer. they published a joint op ed in usa today where they demanded change from washington. but they also pointed to their own unique role in this fight, not just with the former congresswoman as a victim of gun violence, but with her having been a member of congress who was a staunch supporter of the second amendment. gabby giffords was a very pro-gun rights democratic member of congress. she and her husband are not commie liberal pinkos coming to confiscate yours guns. they are both gun owners themselves. "forget the boogie man of big bad government coming to dispossess you of your firearms. as a western woman and a persian gulf war combat veteran who have exercised our second amendment rights, we do not want to take awa
as the historical event over 200 years ago is written about and talked about and people who are up for election? was this just an inevitable outgrowth of our part of the culture that talks about these issues this way? >> guest: i think to a large extent yes and if you look historically, it hasn't changed much over even the last 200 years. this kind of eerie propagandistic view of history. even while that history was being made, people were very propagandist. people were propagandist about washington and jefferson and what they meant. so yes, i do think that's part of the genre. and i think that part of the genre needs to be people like me, writing correctives and saying if this is where you are getting your history, it's wrong or it's not wrong, it's at least much more complicated than it's being made out to be. >> host: while we are talking about this point of being more complicated, let's say they have very good copy editors who went back and said instead of the founders, many of the founder said something or most of the founders or it was a common opinion at the time. with that simple change
in the last election. wherever they can they'll turn against the president and his appointees. it's as simple as that. >> jennifer: do you think the white house, because of his previous confirmations being relatively easy, do you think the president thought lou's confirmation would be easy as well. >> no, i don't. the president came in and i got to hear from all of them. i will tell that you they are really of the understanding now and it's very different from the first year, the first administration that the non-stop partisan wear warfare from the republicans will continue. the only way to deal with this is to confront it. i think that they're determined to make sure the president has his own team in place at the cabinet and his policies will be implemented. >> jennifer: this is so interesting to me, do you think that suggests what you said there, that he's not going to be bowed by what will be objections by the senate no matter what. they're going to come no matter what. he'll put in place the team that he wants. if that isn't the case, why wouldn't he have stuck with susan rice, for exampl
it was unaware of the pastor's prior stance at the time he was elected. a new study has found up to half of all food worldwide is going to waste. britain's institution of mechanical engineers sayat least 1.2 billion of the 4 billion tons of food produced each year is thrown out due to problems with harvesting, transporting and storage, as well as wasteful behavior from sellers and consumers. the report calls food wastage -- the findings come as nations across the globe continue to grapple with soaring food prices. brendan cox of the group save the children said the soaring food costs threaten to cause more unnecessary deaths. >> there is a new normal of the food crisis. and the last year we have seen wheat increased by 25%. already around 3 million children die every year as a result of malnutrition. what could happen next year could make the situation much worse. >> fears of a spike in food prices have run after a long standing drought prompted the obama administration to declare a natural disaster in large parts of the midwest. conditions in the courtroom and we producing states -- kansas, co
. look at the banker bailouts that we have had. henry paulson, even in the elections when congress voted it down the first time, the banker bail out the last month or so of george bush's administration. obama and mccain came off of the campaign trails. they got on the phone and they got the congressional black caucus to change their votes and twist some arms and it passed and obama became president. i announcing that is why he became president, but you have to look at where the money is coming from. host: he is asking questions about jack lew, the next secretary of treasury. dave clark from politico joins us to learn a little bit more about him. to the caller pose a question about his background, particularly about wall street, can you tell us and on his experiences there and what he brings to the white house? caller: most of his background is predominantly a denture washington. he was a top house aide for a long time. he worked in the clinton administration. in the obama administration he was also the director as well working at the state department. he did spend two or three years, 200
it will end up? >> well, i think all through the election season, all they ever talk about was leaving afghanistan, but this is real. this was a very big deal this week and a very big change. u.s. troops will be in an advise and train -- that's all they'll be doing come spring. >> pulling back from the front lines. >> pulling back from the front lines. they will be with afghan forces. the president has not announced how fast they'll draw down but i suspect by the end of this year we could be down to 30,000 troops. we're 66,000 troops now, possibly down to 30,000 and when we really draw down in 2014, when we are no longer doing combat missions, i think you'll see anywhere from only 6,000 to 9,000 and the important thing to remember about that, george, is two details. tail means the enablers, the support, we would really have if we had 3,000 troops there, we would really have only 800 trigger pullers. you'll see a lot of counterterrorism action, all of those things joe biden talked about a long time ago. i think that's all we'll have there in the future. >> senator corker, are you comfor
. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what jumps out at you. help us decode what was in that meeting, what was most pournt. >> is think what jumped out at me mostly was the acceleration in the transition. which i think is good. that american troops are going to be leaving at a faster clip. and also on the function side, so to speak that the role of american troops in combat as was mentioned in the clip is going to be phased out. also, what president karz
direction? >> we have lost two national elections, i would say no. we're in politics to win, we need to think about doing something different. >> today, governor chris christie appeared on five morning shows and is also on the cover of this week's issue "time magazine." today, the governor gave the republicans this advice. >> what are you getting right that republicans in washington, d.c. are getting so wrong? what don't they get? >> we're compromising when we need to. i'm in divided government. i have a democratic senate and democratic assembly. so what that means is, i'm not going to get everything i want. >> here is what chris christie thinks of the tea party. >> i don't think they have had too much influence, and i think there is a lot of things -- >> you don't think that is why the house republicans have not been able to get to a fiscal cliff deal? >> you know i think there are a lot of reasons, some of them personal, they get into these kind of toxic competitions with each other, and these internal palace intrigue things, don't look at me puzzled. >> you mean john boehner -- >>
was about keeping washington in check. not this time. >> presidents have a way of getting re-elected and deciding how about i do what i want to do. how about i choose who i'm comfortable with. and they have extra confidence that they can do that. and they should be able to do it. and -- >> there is sort of -- you know, it's -- by the way, it's also why they've had this diversity issue a little bit, not thinking about that. >> it doesn't explain why he didn't stand behind susan rice. if that was really his view. he's choosing the fight over hagel, in part i'm sure because he gave up on susan rice. why didn't he do it for her? >> it's possible he never was for susan the way others were. there really was a split in that white house. >> it looked like it had touched a personal cord with him when she was being criticized. may be separate from whether he wanted her for the job. i think the attitude is what's driving this on hagel. and i think his comfort level, his knowledge that if he's going to deal with defense budget cuts, he wants a republican in there. i'm not sure as andrea mitchell
is behind me. i won this election convincingly. now, i'm not sure how much the debt ceiling played into the election for average voters, but i think president obama is trying to say, look, i have a mandate. i won a second term amid this economic crisis, amid questions about my handling of it, and now it's up to you guys, whether you want to deal with me or deal with the consequences. >> and he knows the difference in his popularity compared to the congressional popularity. >> right. >> susan page, we talked about this on friday. now, the question that jackie of the "new york times" asked of the president. the lack of diversity in his frontline cabinet appointments so far, this was his response. >> i would just suggest that everybody kind of wait until they've seen all my appointments, who is in the white house staff and who is in my cabinet before they rush to judgment. >> well, was that compelling and persuasive and convincing? >> well, i think we should expect the next appointments to have some female faces, whether they're top aides to the treasury secretary or the new budget di
ben cramer wrote "what it takes," a thousand-plus page book about the 1988 presidential election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis, and george herbert walker bush. nbc first read calls it the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. ♪ i have direct deposit on my visa prepaid. my paycheck is loaded right on my card. automatic. i am not going downtown standing in line to cash it. i know where my money is, because it is in my pocket. i got more time with my daughter, we got places to go. [ freeman ] go open a new world, with visa prepaid. more people go with visa. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days since the shooting in newtown, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left six dead and injured u.s. congresswoman gabrielle giffords. the vice president is spearheading a gun control task force in response, and outside organizations are organized to make sure this time gun laws are strengthened. g
election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis, and george herbert walker bush. nbc first read calls it the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days since the shooting in newtown, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left six dead and injured u.s. congresswoman gabrielle giffords. the vice president is spearheading a gun control task force in response, and outside organizations are organized to make sure this time gun laws are strengthened. gun control advocates are up against a vehement and sometimes incoherent opposition. one example, alex jones, who has called for piers morgan to be deported because of his positions. last night morgan asked jones why. take a look at the face on the pro-guns side. >> we did it to point out this is globalism, and the mega banks that control the planet and brag they have taken over in bloomberg, ap, reuters, you name it, brag tha
" a thousand-plus page book about the 1988 presidential election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis and george ber hert walker book. it's the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. i had pain in my pelvic area... and bleeding that wasn't normal for me. she said i had to go to the doctor. turned out i had uterine cancer, a type of gynecologic cancer. i received treatment and we're confident i'll be fine. please listen to your body. if something doesn't feel right for two weeks or longer, see your doctor. get the inside knowledge about gynecologic cancers. knowing can make all the difference in the world. [ male announcer ] the exclusive air suspension in the 2013 ram 1500. ♪ engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days thins the shooting in new toup, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left
to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected country, it's sensitive to public criticism if you look at the train accident, which is their version of twitter, disciplined the party chief who was in charge of building up the railways. this guy who was seen as a god is on his way to prison because of corruption. think about the terrible things that go on in the world to people who are at the with him of the police chief or minorities or the terrible status that women are treated in much of the developing world. people have cameras. you can now anonymously report things. you can imagine a network where a bad thing is occurring. you can report it anonymously. you can have anonymous responders. you can build those kind of networks and they're in development now. the fact that everybody is connected has a large number of step functions and improvement there. think about health care. we were talking earlier in the video about 2050 about health care and people sort of snickered when the gentleman mentioned to it, the f.d.a. just approved the first
champion in the years to come. to have some kind of revolution but when the next election for speaker happens to republican conference conservatives especiallespeciall y within the caucus will remember how cantor handled the fiscal cliff and that may help them. there were other high-profile republicans who voted it had interestiinteresti ng votes. paul wright in the house voted for it. marco rubio on the senate votes no on it. what he think the implications are about? >> guest: to see there are 2016 implications is a little far-fetched but if you love politics you have to look at it. when i was inside of the house chamber watching the fiscal vote, he really is a power player within the party. one of the most important things he is done since the campaign is aligned himself for speaker john boehner and a lot of people did not expect this. one of the the reasons his dumbest and i've spoken people who are close to right write is he wants to make 2013 if budget year. in order to do that he needs boehner support so i don't think ryan will actively break with boehner. >> guest: we have not
election because of controversial statements on the israeli reluctance. among the reason for that concern and in some cases outright opposition. seven of the 12 republican members of the armed services committee expressing some opposition with at least three senators already saying they will vote no. senator david fisher saying, i will be a no-vote and on the floor. south carolina senator lindsay gramm calling hegel and antagonistic and in-your-face nomination to all of those who support israel. freshman senator ted crews of texas absolutely unloading while calling him too weak for the job >> it is interesting. the president seems bound and determined to proceed down this path despite the fact that his record is troubling. he has not been a friend, and in my view, the united states should stand unshakeable with the nation of israel, and he is consistently advocating weakness with respect to our enemies, with respect to the nation of iran, he has exposed sanctions, and the job of the secretary of defense is to be a serious, credible strength and a deterrent and, unfortunately, i think weak
connell. but he's not too worried. yet. >> look, the election's going to occur in 2014. in the meantime i've got my hands full trying to deal with all the issues that we've been discussing here this morning. we'll worry about the election in 2014. >>> if you read only one thing this morning, my must-read today is something to look forward to. michael j. fox has signed a deal for his own sitcom. he'll play a news anchor who quits because of parkinson's disease but then has a comeback. such a great comedic actor. such an inspiration, too, to so many. that story is up on our facebook page at facebook.com/jansingco. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pass down something he will be grateful for. that's the power of german engineering. ♪ back to you. >>> democrats are firing back as republicans draw a line in the sand over the looming money battles ahead. at least one even supports a
parties, no breakup, no pulling away, no clever arrangement before the election in may 2015? you will be industry working together until the day that election is called, on time and on schedule? >> let me take the second of the question first. i've always said, nick has always said, this is a full five your coalition. the public wants us, as nick has just said, to work hard on their behalf right through this parliament to fix the problems that we have inherited and to set out and deliver the long-term plans we've spoken about. for me it is absolutely five your plan, a five your parliament, a five your government. it's about work. it's about delivery, not partisanship. on the first part of your question, i hate to sort of spoil the party, but let me put it like this. we are married, not to each other. we are both happily married. this is a government, not a relationship. it's a government about delivering for people, because of the mess we are left in by the previous government, because of the huge challenges that we face. what we said to people two and half years ago was that we
and elected officials notwithstanding their clinical differences can come together and honor the democratic process. it's something very special. and it's something that i cannot take for granted because where i was born, and where i grew up, we did not have it. and what i was thinking about last night as i was thinking about today, i was thinking about the image, the very vivid image that still sticks in my head about how i came here. and i think about my mom, my two sisters and me. literally walking, climbing mountains, crossing the border, carrying my little sister. make sure i do not fall off the cliff of making sure my mom was safe. and i remember that dark night, when you are cold and trying to get through, you see the lights in the city on the other side of the border. and those lights represent a great deal of hope. a great deal of promise. and i think that often times we take that hope and the promise for granted. because what we have here is very special. and i am so grateful to my parents that they literally risk their lives to bring me here to give
and haurlting deportation of illegal immigrants just prior to the election. in the wall street journal he explains why republicans must embrace immigration reform. 70 percent of the 12 and a half latino voters cast votes for the president in the last election. quote, i think it's a rhetoric by a handful of voices in minority but loud nonetheless that allowed conservatives are anti hispanic and anti immigration. i don't think there's a lot of concern in this country that will somehow get over run by ph.d.'s and entrepreneurs. marco rubio sees this as a gateway issue for hispanic voters that could lead to migration for the republican parties if successful. if they want to over hall they need to convince big labor to go on board. >>> thanks so much. >> now it is my turn. >> thank you, jennifer. immigration will be the only tough fight ahead. president obama's promise he will tackle gun control in his second term and something that has already drawn fierce criticism. two of the cabinet picks will face confirmation battle. he will have to negotiate on the debt ceiling and see queststration. he
of 201. baseball elects no players to the hall of fame. jason star will talk about why this hand and what it means. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ "southern wild." >> "silver linings playbook." >> "zero dark thirty". >> "lincoln." steven spielberg and kathleen kennedy producers. >> "les miserables." >> "life of pi." ang lee. >> "amore" nom noise
won the election, wendell wilkie, who he beat, with enough is. they remained friends. wilkie said to the president, why do you keep that man so close to you. batman being hopkins. wilkie did not like hot cans and roosevelt set coming out, you may be in the south is sunday and you lenders can, but he asks for not need except to serve me. >> now discussion on the growing numbers of women serving in congress and the act. from "washington journal," this is about 40 minutes. >> joining us now, the president of emily's list. thank you for joining us. >> guest: thank you for being here. postreligious had elections. how did women fare? >> guest: this doesn't mandate. this is an election about an historic member of women sworn in to congress last week. i'm filled with pride to see how these women walking in. this election was about women voters and women's issues, some of which i would've preferred not having debate about, but nevertheless, i really think as we move forward, we'll see more and more women stepping up to run. post out as a result, 20 senators, 81 representatives in 2013. the
. japanese vote again in july in the election for the upper house and abe needs to show he's doing something to speed the recovery. >> there's a lot of money involved. the question is will it work? >> certainly these measures will provide a temporary boost but they will not solve the underlying problems. abe says he'll build his economic policy on three pillars -- increased public spending, monetary easing and doing more to encourage growth. we've seen in the stimulus how abe plans to spend taxpayers' money. on top of that he is urging the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2% and to get more money flowing through the economy. the lines on the final pillar measures toward growth are less clear. some have insisted sustainable growth will only come by making industries more competitive through deregulation. but, government leaders have yet to articulate how they'll make that happen. >> you just mentioned this could be a temporary boost. i guess the question is what does abe need to do in the longer term. >> the labor force is shrinking. so is domestic demand. no matter how much money
and the bank of japan. >> translator: during the cent allower house election campaign i call eed for the central banko set a 2% inflation target and take bold, monetary easing steps. i want the bank to take this into consideration when it forms monetary policy. >> translator: the government and the central bank have had monetary discussions three times a month. we will continue to exchange with the government. >> they hope to get certain guarantees from the government. these include not having to state when the inflation target will be achieved and the flexibility to change policy if prices rise with no economic recovery. it's not only the bank of japan that will play a role to get out of inflation, the abe will also have a part. support on cutting edge medicine and school efforts to reduce bullying will be included. more than $2 billion will be allocated to promote advanced technologies be they will air mark $227 million to support research on regenerative medicine. the plan calls for an extra $11 million to double the time counselors work at elementary and junior high schools a
. of course from is a political dimension to this. japanese vote again in july in the election for the upper house and abe needs to show he's doing something to speed the recovery. >> there's a lot of money involved. the question is will it work? >> certainly these measures will provide a temporary boost but they will not solve the underlying problems. abe says he'll build his economic policy on three pillars -- increased public spending, monetary easing and doing more to encourage growth. we've seen in the stimulus how abe plans to spend taxpayers' money. on top of that he is urging the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2% and to get more money flowing through the economy. the lines on the final pillar measures toward growth are less clear. some have insisted sustainable growth will only come by making industries more competitive through deregulation. but, government leaders have yet to articulate how they'll make that happen. >> you just mentioned this could be a temporary boost. i guess the question is what does abe need to do in the longer term. >> the labor force is shrinking.
of the assessment public appeals board and to the john burden done and she was elected to the board of supervisors in 2,002 and pan banned toxic chemicals and toys and led effort to protect local woman and minority business in his contracting practices focused on woman's health and domestic violence suspicious now keep in mind this is a ten year career that i'm condensing into five bullet points? he was a pointed majority and speaker pro testimony making mer her the most senior asian woman in the state of california she pass of the legislation, again like i mentioned she led the evident and continues to lead the effort to pass the high speed rail bonds and looked out for the san franciscoians interest in passing legislation to improve reliability and healthcare child care programs and protect consumers and regulating lock submit and tatoo parlors but with a ms. miles will be leaving after ten years of service she has been a personal friend and mentor to me and she has spend a lot of time mentoring a lot of people in this particular champ better and she is a woman that, that i respect and it's a
that in chapter 3, we are handling complaints alleged violations of the ordinance by elected officials or department heads, but also those that come directly to us and don't go through the task force. is that right? >> i think this language was included just to make sure it was clear that any referral from the task force or in the off chance by the supervisor of record. this is not something that would come directly to the commission. >> but a referral, where the order of determination is a willful violation of a department head or an elected official would still go under chapter 3; right? >> correct. >> and this is just referring to allegations of non-willful. >> okay. >> so katherine is right in one aspect that the potential exists and the other part of this there was a concern that if something that staff was not a party of interest, if you will and a referral. so the only time that staff would be a party of interest is if we initiated the complaint and therefore, the executive director wouldn't have a role apart from providing you a legal recommendation on what was presente
all. >> next speaker. >> president chiu, supervisors, elected officials and public. i stand to be in a great deal of excitement because within our african-american tradition we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. i congratulate those who have been elected on this most auspicious occasion. i want to say that i think it is very good that supervisor cohen was selected as the person to be president. and i want to offer my own support of that cause. supervisor breed, you stated something about doctor king. i thought i might leave this quote with you. for doctor king said, "change does not roll in on the wheels of ineligibility, but comes through continuous struggle. men cannot ride you unless your back is bent." i hope you see this time of change of having a woman of color as a president of this board. >> president: next speaker. >> good day board. president chiu and other board members here. my name is ross rhodes, as part of the organization call ace. i'm here speaking on behalf of my other fellow brothers and sisters in the organiz
all recognized from the last election that i think has huge potential to be participants and be excited about this program and young communities of color and different kinds of communities that before hadn't been as engaged, and it seems like a way to engage and educate those communities that really around social media, and i saw in here there is a big focus working with cbo's and operating their networks, but i would love to see something in here that social media is going to be maximized, what that looks like, whatever the plan is and i know for me and i'm not the emerging demographic and i'm not home much but to reach that constituency we have to maximize the tools which they respond to. i would love to see that as part of the plan. >> all right. we will highlight that more. we have a website. you're certainly aware of the public utilities commission twitter and facebook and other social media activities and cleanpower sf will certainly be engaging in all of those activities. i think maybe it could be highlighted better in the budget section certainly where we're ta
] . >> thank you to supervisor avalos and i'm for the going anywhere i loss an election, i didn't die. so i'm still going to be out there and this weekend, i went to a bet thing and so who knows what my next ventures will be and i still have my oslo and scandinavian -- a farmling community in the central valuegee and so i think i is it have -- so if you are thinking what am i doing going to loss oh, in the middle of winter., you know i saw a film and never scoped my interest in scandinavian culture and is that doesn't take away at all to my comment and being proud of being latin and sevenning the latin community this past year and so i'm grateful to my supporter and is grateful to the residents of district five and i love the city and happy to have had the opportunity to serve on this board. a. (applause). . >> thank you supervisor olague. our final accommodation of the day will be to our second colleague local be leaving us today although he know he is not going far sean i have to say when i read the resolution that was draft of the to you today i was honestly blown away by how much
more much this elective life and i know malia brought up the love for your family but some. our legislative staff have been waiting with shots to get the festivity started and so thank you sean for your years of service. >>> thank you very much mr. president i'll try to keep it brief and needless to say, i don't believe that sean elsburnd was the first people to endorse he for supervisor but, one of the things that, became very clear to my when i first got elected and started talking to colleagues on the board of supervisors was how seriously sean else person takes this job and i don't know that i fully appreciated how challenging this job can be. it's a job that really dmadle the very best of all of us to do this right besides the legislative work, the work that happens in terms of you know serving addressing the nuts and bolts of what happens in a neighborhood, what was so incredible about coming on the board and talking to sean was just learning from him how he approached it up you know that the fact that he saw this as an opportunity to serve and that he took this serious
next speaker was an elected member of the brussels parliament representing the green party. she was also minister of social affairs, health, and equal opportunities in the government before starting her political career in 1993, she worked in the european level in environmental and social organizations for 10 years. as a politician, she focuses particularly on the development of economically depressed areas which despite their assets face challenges like poverty, unemployment, and a lack of development. she believes these neighbors are a key to a vibrant and prosperous brussels. please. >> i'm happy to be here and as far as i could take note is the situation for cyclists as well as in oakland as in portland as in san francisco -- excuse me, i think, yes, important to be again the whole different thing. but as i understand most probably brussels is somewhere in-between. in the last few years, we managed to raise the amount of cyclists let's say from 1% in 2000 to what today is estimated but how did the countings go, but it's estimated as being 3 1/2%. i have made it as one of my
there all the time, working on elections, and after my dad ran you helped my brother run. the same people helping us, being part of the family, working together for the city. i remember some of the crazy things we did growing up in political life. going to i think it's call -- i don't know if it's called the muni lot or parking lot and where the buss are in the morning so we could put a handout on every seat and bus that was there. i remember standing out in front of markets and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on any power he needed to be even if it meant being fired from the board and "you're not doing enough. you're not raising enough money". he would take on anyone anytime if it was the right thing to do. he felt so st
nothing about the time in which the president is inaugurated at the elections -- they took place last october. the inauguration was supposed to be today. i would imagine for a month or so after that, everybody would be perfectly happy. he is still president. just not in conditions to be president. >> the election he one by 11 points against -- it originally looked like it would be much tighter race. he did appoint a vice president, nicholas marudo. will he be the effective president until he returns? >> not absolutely clear. there is another man, the president of the national assembly. there are certain scenarios when the -- where the president of the national assembly could take over. but i think maduro has been anointed as the successor. if chavez was ill -- or could not return, was dying, then chavez would resign and maduro would face elections with a 30 days. >> it could not just be a handover of power. >> he would have to go to the polls. >> is there a script, of the moment -- rift between these two men? are they looking for a different trajectory in terms of the revolution? >> i
in election when the people kept them in charge of the house in the same election. election have consequences, of course. perhaps hiking taxes on the rich is up with of them. but that does not mean we don't do a lick about our debt. not getting a handle on spending wasn't one of them. hearing only one side don't make you a journalist but doing so to ignore the other side makes you charyl top. charlatan. go after the goose, go after the gander. what is a gander? do you know? be fair, balanceed. both sides. have at it. >> dana: hello, i'm dana perino with kimberly guilfoyle, bob beckel, eric bolling, andrea tantaros. it's 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> dana: earlier today, president obama held the final press conference of his first term in the east room of the white house. the main attraction, our old friend the debt ceiling. they could default on the debt, unless the debt ceiling is raised. republicans want the president to cut spending before they i gree on a deal. but the president at no time seem eager for compromise. listen. >> we have to stop lurking from crisis to
for the republican party. >> you're in politics to win to get your ideas. we lost two national elections in the row. we need to think about doing something different. >> there's plenty in new jersey in politics, as well. >> a lot less than there used to be. >> a new poll confirms christie winning support from both sides of the aisle. 73% of new jerseyans approve of him, including 62% of democrats. last night christie delivered his state of the state address, which was chock full of calls for cooperation. we don't have that sound. the washington post dana milbank paints christie as an anomaly. americans are crying out for an end to ideological warfare. that has developed into christie's signature in new jersey. a poll found support for the tea party is at record lows, while the poll found 24% called themselves tea party members in 2010, 8% see themselves as one now. evenly between democrats and republicans, that changed this past year. currently, 47% of americans identify with democrats compared to 42% who align with the gop. last night on "hardball," crusader dick army diagnosed the problem as mist
of americans all across this country and people around the world. and elected officials, i think, are really paying a lot more attention to this and then taking action. the leadership that is already come forward by president obama and then his asking vice president biden to take on this issue, the vice president's record is clear in terms of public safety and taking swift action to make america much safer. the vice president has been working this issue since the president asked him to jump on it, virtually, every day. so i think this is a unique moment. democrats, republicans, mayors, governors and we hear from the president and vice president. the vice president is having these meetings. he talked about what happened earlier today. something good is going to happen out of an incredible tragedy in connecticut and the tragedies that mothers and fathers and sisters and brothers and neighbors experience on a daily basis all across the cities of the united states. >> that's what i want to address. because newtown absolutely a despicable, unthinkable act. but we've been seeing in cities across t
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